How digital innovations are aiding high street retail

Whether it’s for clothing, food or fun we all need to shop so we could say that everyone has an expert opinion on what creates the perfect shopping experience, but there are many eventualities to consider and overcome.

How long will a shopper remain in a store where product shelves are messy and randomly stacked? There is only one checkout available, and the line is far too long for your lunchtime visit? Where do you go for help when there’s no one around to ask – and when you find the store associate, how do you deal with the reply “it’s not my department.”

What appears at first glance as a list of grievances can also act as an inventory of areas where stores can improve. Let’s remember – customers will abandon their visit and go to a competitor if they have a negative shopping experience and the ultimate price to pay could be continued losses and eventually closure.

In 2016, 30 medium sized and large UK retail businesses closed the doors on 1,500 stores putting more than 26,000 people out of work, according to the Centre for Retail Research. But the problem is not getting customers into the building as 94 per cent of retail transactions still happen in the store, according to Deloitte. The challenge is providing the expected level of in-store service in a new and innovative way.

Using innovation to create the ultimate experience

Retailers place varying levels of worth on innovation, but with the wealth of technology and solutions readily available, customers expect more from their shopping experience – in fact, it’s an approach demanded by consumers.

A recent report by PwC, in which they surveyed over 22,000 online shoppers from around the globe, states that two-thirds of those asked said their favourite retailer was quite innovative in some way. Although the retail sector is getting to grips with a range of technological improvements, such as social media engagement and delivery options – innovation should also be applied to create a seamless omni-channel experience.

Customers want to shop from anywhere – mobile phone, tablet, laptop, PC or wearable’s and whichever channel used it should be twinned with the traditional bricks and mortar store. Transaction and browsing data should be manipulated to inform store associates on customer likes and dislikes or help build a new style or outfit based on the latest must-have items.

Taking an innovative approach will be the game changer – ensuring customers receive the expected in-store experience that will keep them coming back for more.